Health Care Professionals

Ministry Research Funding Opportunities

Health System Research Fund (HSRF) Targeted Calls

  1. Patient-Oriented Research in Mental Health and Addictions
  2. Patient-Oriented Research on Health System Integration and Performance

Under Review: 2018/19 Targeted Call for Patient-Oriented Research in Mental Health and Addictions - Notice of Intent and Full Application Submissions
Launch Date: January 17, 2018
Notice of Intent Deadline: February 20, 2018
Full Application Deadline: March 14, 2018

 

Currently Open: 2018/19 Targeted Call Program for Patient-Oriented Research on Health System Integration and Performance (PORHSIP) - Prospective Evaluation Research Notice of Intent and Full Application Submissions
Launch Date: March 29, 2018
Notice of Intent Deadline: April 26, 2018
Full Application Deadline: June 4, 2018

Overview

The purpose of the HSRF Targeted Calls is to solicit and fund focused research applications within MOHLTC priority areas. The two new Calls focus on Patient-Oriented Research in Mental Health and Addictions and Patient-Oriented Research on Health System Integration and Performance.

For the Targeted Call for Patient-Oriented Research in Mental Health and Addictions:
For each of the priority areas, key knowledge gaps related to current/anticipated policy development and program development were identified as targeted research areas of interest for policy makers and knowledge users through a consultative process. Refer to the Full Application for definitions of targeted research priority areas and sub-priority areas.

For the Targeted Call Program for Patient-Oriented Research on Health System Integration and Performance (PORHSIP) - Prospective Evaluation Research:
Refer to the Full Application for definitions of targeted research sub-priority areas.

Applicants will be assessed on the extent to which sex and gender have been considered in their proposed research (i.e., rationale, methods and knowledge translation and exchange (KTE) plan). Additionally, applicants will be assessed on the extent to which patients have been meaningfully engaged in the proposed research.

Five additional cross-cutting components have also been identified for HSRF awards (excluding the Targeted Call Program for PORHSIP). Applicants are encouraged to incorporate any/all of these components into their projects where applicable and/or feasible. These cross-cutting components are:

Refer to the HSRF Guidelines for definitions and selected examples of government initiatives and commitments related to each cross-cutting component.

For the HSRF Targeted Call Program for PORHSIP, the project includes consideration of health equity (populations in the HEIA and Supplements), Indigenous, French Language lenses as well as sex (biologic) and gender (social) analysis.

Patients First: Action Plan for Healthcare outlines the ministry's commitment to expand how patients are engaged throughout the health care system. To meet this commitment, the ministry is also expanding the patient engagement component of all HSRF Calls. All research funded through the HSRF must include meaningful patient engagement to ensure the patient's perspective is considered in all aspects of a research project.

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Notice of Intent

To assist in planning for the review process, the MOHLTC requests that interested HSRF Targeted Call applicants submit a completed notice of intent (NOI) using the MOHLTC's online grant application system. The NOI is mandatory. Some of the components of the NOI will be binding. Specifically, the targeted priority area, the sub-priority area and the Project Lead identified in the NOI cannot be changed in the Full Application.

The NOI is strictly for administrative purposes. It will not be evaluated, nor will it be shared with the review panels. You must create a username and password for the online form. Applicants will be able to save and review their NOI before submitting. Applicants will receive an email acknowledgement of receipt of their NOI submission within 48 hours.

Note: If you have previously submitted a NOI to the HSRF Program Awards, Capacity Awards, Targeted Calls, or MOHLTC partnership funding for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Partnerships for Health System Improvement (PHSI) competition, your login information remains unchanged.

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Full Application

Applicants must complete the Full Application form through the MOHLTC's online grant application system. Applicants will be able to save and review their Full Application before submitting.

See Section 5 for Full Application Instructions.

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Review Process

HSRF Targeted Calls competitions use a comprehensive multi-stakeholder review process that brings together scientific peer-reviewers with people with lived experience and health system knowledge users.

The process for the review of applications is as follows:

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Full Application Instructions

Targeted Call for Patient-Oriented Research in Mental Health and Addictions
The Detailed Full Application Instructions for the Targeted Call for Patient-Oriented Research in Mental Health and Addictions provide instructions for each section of the Full Application.

Targeted Call Program for Patient-Oriented Research on Health System Integration and Performance - Prospective Evaluation Research:
The Detailed Full Application Instructions for the Targeted Call for PORHSIP provide instructions for each section of the Full Application.

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Resources

The Research Planning and Management Unit will accept written questions about the process via email at ResearchUnit@ontario.ca.

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Current Grants funded through HSRF Targeted Calls

2017/18 Successful Applicants

The 2017/18 HSRF Targeted Calls were launched to solicit and fund focused research applications in Nursing. Key knowledge gaps related to current/anticipated policy development and program development were identified as areas of interest for policy makers and knowledge users through a consultative process. Successful applications demonstrated scientific rigour and research excellence, as judged by a Scientific Review Panel of external experts.

Priority Area

Lead/Co-Lead  and Sponsoring Institution

Project

Brief Synopsis

Nursing

Dr. Mary Fox/Dr. Souraya Sidani York University

Adapting hospital-to-home transitional care interventions to the Ontario rural healthcare context

Transitional Care (TC) is provided by nurses to help patients and their families manage care after a hospital stay. TC was designed and evaluated with patients in urban areas, and it may not meet the needs of rural patients, who have more hospital readmissions than patients in urban areas. This project aims to improve TC in rural areas in Ontario. Patients, their families, and nurses who provide TC will be invited to discuss how to revise TC to better meet their needs. The impacts are better prepared patients and families in managing care at home, fewer emergency room visits and readmissions, improved health outcomes, and cost savings to Ontario’s healthcare system.

Nursing

Dr. Andrea Baumann/Dr. Patricia Bradley, McMaster University

Internationally Educated Nurses in Ontario: Barriers and Strategies to Support Timely Registration with the College of Nurses

The multicultural, multilingual needs of Ontario's patients are changing and require a diverse workforce to provide safe and effective care. Internationally educated nurses (IENs) are a valuable resource to meet this need, however many who enter the province face barriers to timely registration. This project addresses current and anticipated barriers in the registration process with the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO). A mixed methods approach including multi-stakeholder analysis, linking of secondary databases and a patient perspective analysis will be used to analyze the impact of policy on IEN registration and integration. Results will provide evidence to inform decision-making to improve registration and ultimately impact patient care.

Nursing

Dr. Lianne Jeffs, University of Toronto

The NURSING SCOpe of Practice Evaluation Project: The NURSING-SCOPE Project

The NURSING-SCOPE Project will involve co-designing and validating how best to evaluate the scopes of practice and roles of all categories of nursing and their contribution to quality and safe health care in Ontario. Researchers will examine the various types of nursing roles across the health care system and engage key experts, including patients and their caregivers, in determining what needs to be measured. The NURSING-SCOPE Project evaluation framework and knowledge translation products may be used by a variety of knowledge users to inform policy directions and investments to target improvement and sustainability efforts that optimize the scope and role of nursing.

Nursing

Dr. Wendy Gifford/ Dr. Roanne Thomas, University of Ottawa

Building nursing capacity to provide culturally safe cancer survivorship care with Indigenous people in rural and remote areas: An integrated knowledge translation study

Cancer among Indigenous people is increasing faster than overall Canadian rates. Lack of culturally safe cancer survivorship supports contributes to poor health outcomes, decreased quality of life, and low 5-year survival rates. Nurses can enhance survivorship support, however it is not well understood how this can be done in culturally safe and responsive ways.

Researchers will develop and implement culturally responsive cancer survivorship strategies with Indigenous peoples in rural and remote Ontario communities. A toolkit will be developed to inform practices, programs and policy. The expected impact is improved nursing practices across rural and remote Indigenous communities, culturally responsive survivorship supports and higher quality of life for Indigenous peoples.

2016/17 Successful Applicants

The 2016/17 HSRF Targeted Calls were launched to solicit and fund focused research applications on Problem Gambling and Tobacco. Key knowledge gaps related to current/anticipated policy development and program development were identified as areas of interest for policy makers and knowledge users through a consultative process. Successful applications demonstrated scientific rigour and research excellence, as judged by a Scientific Review Panel of external experts. Separate Scientific Review Panels were convened for each priority area. 

Priority Area

Lead/Co-Lead  and Sponsoring Institution

Project

Brief Synopsis

Problem Gambling

Dr. Tara Elton-Marshall and Dr. Nigel Turner
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)

Understanding the Impact of Online Gambling Opportunities on Problem Gambling: Evidence to Inform Prevention Strategies

The goal of this study is to identify problematic online gambling behaviour and to inform problem gambling prevention strategies. Online gambling behaviour among a representative sample of youth in Ontario will be examined. A representative sample of adults in Ontario will be used to examine how online gambling has changed since the legalization of online gambling, to inform responsible gambling practices and to identify problematic online gambling behaviour. The results of this study will be used to develop teaching materials for online gambling curriculums focusing on prevention; develop prevention and training resources; and improve practices around prevention.

Problem Gambling

Dr. Nigel Turner & Dr. Robert Murray
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)

 

The context of gambling treatment: towards creating an online service to reduce problem gambling

A small percentage of people who suffer from problem gambling enter treatment. Barriers to treatment include, lack of daycare, shift work, long distance travel and mobility or sensory disabilities. This project aims to increase access to treatment for problem gamblers by achieving the following goals: 1. Identify gaps in the current continuum of treatment for problem gambling here in Ontario; 2. Explore potential treatments for problem gambling using internet based services; 3. Determine and evaluate best practices to implementing treatment using the internet; and, 4. Evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, impact and cost effectiveness of internet-based treatment services.

Problem Gambling

Dr. Michael Wohl & Dr. Christopher Davis
Carleton University

Building the Evidence Base for Cultivating Responsible Gambling Knowledge and Habits

This project evaluates the uptake among slot players of My PlaySmart, a new limit-setting program Ontario Lottery and Gaming plans to introduce. Prior to its introduction, players' limit setting propensity will be examined. After the introduction of My PlaySmart, players will be re-contacted to assess uptake and limit setting adherence. Ways My PlaySmart can be improved will be examined. The project will identify best practices for the development of high quality and effective responsible gambling programs that meet the needs of Ontarians.

Problem Gambling

Dr. Flora Matheson & Dr. Sara Guilcher

St Michael’s Hospital

Optimizing support and service delivery for problem gambling among people living with complex needs

The evidence on the burden of health and social needs among people of low income and who gamble in excess is growing. Problem gambling is linked to many issues, including substance use, mental health concerns, childhood physical, emotional and psychological trauma, chronic illness, disability and relationship loss. Current services and interventions, either do not address problem gambling at all, or neglect to integrate interventions into existing. In this project, researchers will design targeted interventions to address the complex needs of persons with problem gambling. The broader objective is to inform client-centred service delivery for people who experience problem gambling.

Tobacco Control

Dr. Laurie Zawertailo, Dr. Peter Selby
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

E-cigarettes for smoking cessation or harm reduction: real-world comparative effectiveness to other cessation aids and tobacco co-use

This project will address the issue of e-cigarette use in current tobacco smokers in order to further our understanding of the preferences different people might have for tobacco cigarettes, e-cigarettes and nicotine replacement therapy. This information will help health care providers when advising patients on strategies for smoking cessation, and will help inform government policy.

Tobacco Control

Dr. Patricia Smith & Dr. Mandy McMahan
Lakehead University

Implementation of Hospital-based Patient-Centred Smoking Cessation Services for Mental Health

This project addresses tobacco cessation and mental health and addictions populations. The goals are to build on current work to develop an effective tobacco cessation services model for mental health populations, and to generate knowledge that can be used regionally and provincially on how to reach mental health populations and what is needed to keep them engaged and help them quit smoking.

Tobacco Control

Dr. Robert Schwartz & Dr. Michael Chaiton
University of Toronto

REACT: Research on Advancing Cessation Treatment

This project addresses the urgent need to improve smoking cessation outcomes by providing better understanding of the actual versus potential impact of cessation services in Ontario, the characteristics that influence long-term abstinence, the effects of long-term engagement and the effects of cessation for smokers of different characteristics on health status and health care utilization. To advance cessation treatment in Ontario, this project will generate new knowledge to inform cessation policies and practices through a synthesis of existing global and Ontario specific knowledge and two innovative studies.

Tobacco Control

Dr. Robert Schwartz & Dr. Shawn O'Connor
University of Toronto

RECIGWP: Research on E-cigarettes and Waterpipes

The use of e-cigarettes and waterpipes has grown in the past decade. Much is still not known about the health effects of these products. There are concerns that youth are initiating e-cigarette and water pipe use and that these may be related to use of tobacco cigarettes and marijuana. Ontario has adopted measures to ban e-cigarette sales to minors, ban use of e-cigarettes where tobacco smoking is banned and restrict point of sale promotion. To inform policy and practice development and refinement, this study will generate new knowledge through: knowledge synthesis; longitudinal panel studies; population survey data analysis; focus groups; analysis of traditional and social media; thematic analysis of products; packages and ads; and point of sale studies.

For More Information
Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care
Strategic Policy and Planning Division
Research, Analysis and Evaluation Branch
9th Floor Hepburn Block, 80 Grosvenor Street
Toronto ON M7A 1R3
Tel.: 416-327-7759
E-mail : ResearchUnit@ontario.ca